Don’t Quit Your Day Job (2.0)

Could not agree with this post more! Once I had a day job in a fantastic city like Tokyo, it all came together, and now I am just about to launch my best work onto the world, the short film, “An American Piano”.

Screenwriting from Iowa

On this repost Saturday I’m going to actually do a mash-up of two posts I wrote years ago. This was inspired after I visited the first boyhood home of Tennessee Williams in Columbus, Mississippi earlier this week and learned that when he was in his early 20s his shoe salesman father had Tennessee drop out of college and work a 9 to 5 job at the International Shoe Company factory in St. Louis. (The city used to be known for its “shoes, booze, and blues.”)

Tennessee hated the routine so much that it pushed him to write one story a week, writing at night and on weekends.

“Tom would go to his room with black coffee and cigarettes and I would hear the typewriter clicking away at night in the silent house. Some mornings when I walked in to wake him for work, I would find him sprawled fully dressed…

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2 thoughts on “Don’t Quit Your Day Job (2.0)

Add yours

    1. No problem, I really enjoy following your blog, especially as you are another non-LA-based screenwriter.

      Moving to Tokyo really has provided a lot of inspiration and has really helped, as you say, in setting me apart. Especially when I tell people that I’m making a World War Two short film about Japan. I can almost hear their thoughts ticking away, and they suddenly become more interested, as they realise for themselves that we are making something different. It’s better than anything I could tell them.

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